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R.I.P. Seth Putnam (1968 – 2011)

I have no music of Seth I could post here and while I’m yet trying to pay some sort of tribute to the man, I will write more about myself than him, but that’s how it goes sometimes and I can’t change it.

(This photo is from Seth’s facebook)

In person, I met Seth only twice. The first time was in 1986, when we (the Megawimp guys) and he both stayed at the house of Kam Lee and Rick Rozz (both had just left DEATH and were active in MASSACRE). Seth was a friendly, timid guy, as was I. We had been trading records through the mail before and he was always generous and out of the blue, he sometimes would send me free copies of records he knew I was looking for. “Land of the Lost” by THE FREEZE was one I particularly remember, cause we both adored it immensely. In his letters, he often wrote about bands he wanted to form, bands that would be the “most extreme ever” and stuff like that, but until 1988, I didn’t actually hear any of these brainchildren of his. Then I received a big package full of 7″s by a band with the incredible name of ANAL CUNT.
88 tracks, if I remember correctly and without song titles. I didn’t get it, I really didn’t. AC was his take on bands like NAPALM DEATH or my own FEAR OF GOD, he told me, but to me, he seemed to totally miss the point. At that time, when I was high on moralism (which I thought of as “being political” – a lot of people from back then still mess up these two things, by the way), I couldn’t get into what Seth was doing. It wasn’t the band name that many found offensive – it was the lack of what seemed important to me. Bands like 7 MINUTES OF NAUSEA had already taken the game of making the shortest songs possible to an extreme and FEAR OF GOD responded to that with the track “No Harmonies, no Sense”, which consisted only of the counting in (you know, “1-2-3-4”) and then me making one step forward on stage. That was it and as much as people laughed when we did that stunt, it was my comment to that short-song mania. The way I understood it, there was nothing “brutal” in a sense-attacking sense in 7 MON or for that matter, in ANAL CUNT. It was just a puff out.
But that didn’t keep us apart on a personal level. We kept on trading records and tapes for the time being, until the whole AC thing started to really suck him up and we started losing touch.

In 1992, FEAR OF GOD decided to play one final gig. Officially, the band had been put to rest some years ago already, but you know, it wasn’t easy to let go of it. To my surprise and pleasure, I learned that ANAL CUNT were on the bill too, so I would get to meet Seth in person again. The show would take place in Leipzig, a city in the  northeastern part of Germany. The wall had come down not too long ago and the former east block countries had an enormous hunger for all kind of “western” culture. Bands like my own and AC got a lot of airplay in the decaying DDR, the German Democratic Republic, already. I don’t think bands like ours would have gone through censorship a few years earlier, but by 1988, the government structures of the GDR were so undermined, that the system had lost control or interest over certain segments. The response “extreme” bands got in Eastern Germany (and Poland etc., for that matter) was astounding, so by 1992, playing there  seemed only logical to me, and if it only were to say another goodbye.
The day before the show, the other guys in my band flaked out. I bought a train ticket and made my way to Leipzig alone. It was insane: The mass of people showing up, the enthusiasm. The legendary eastern german mullets and moustaches were legion, it was like traveling back in time. The atmosphere was hungry, so that it proved impossible for me to walk around the area, because I had swarms of people following me every step. Very uncomfortable that was. When backstage, I announced that my band wouldn’t play, Seth immediately said that he knew all the songs by heart and could play them on drums or guitar. Then he quickly disappeared only to come back with one or two guys from the band FEEDBACK RECYCLING (who pulled off some crazy, jazzy noise) and there we had an ad-hoc version of FEAR OF GOD ready, with Seth on drums and the guys from FEEDBACK RECYCLING on bass and guitar.
It was a horrible, horrible show (the worst, together with the 2003 gig in Zürich with the MELVINS and TOMAHAWK). Seth and the other guys did a fantastic job, but I fucked up big time, trying to turn the gig into some sort of spoken word performance, full of self righteous wannabe political prayer (bands like DROP DEAD have taken this to an  even absurder level). Preaching and preaching again – to the converted or those who wouldn’t give a shit anyway. How pathetic and shameful.
Seth didn’t care. He had a blast anyway and AC leveled the place. He was rolling around, screaming his lungs out, he jumped off stage and just gave it all. It was incredible. I rarely had seen anything like that before, and with the massive crowd and the chaotic response from it, things actually were rather dangerous and uncontrollable (no bouncers, no security, nothing).
He had changed a great deal between 1986 and 1992. Seth Putnam had invented the character Seth Putnam. You might wanna go as far as saying that he had transformed his life into art. In the years to come, he perfected his over the top provocation stunt and you may or may not see this as a reaction to the reactionary p.c. bullshit that was everywhere. A scene that was once happy to try out new things had turned into a never ending bible study and maybe Seth’s antics were a reaction to that. One that itself ran dry very, very quickly until the whole thing was, in my eyes, disposable. Where’s the provocation when your fans are just a bunch of idiotic rednecks that never were anything but – rednecks. Maybe, as you can read here, it was just provocation for the sake of provocation from the beginning on.

I met Seth again through Facebook this year. We exchanged some messages, had a chitchat or two. He seemed tired and dull. You could still talk to him about music and the “old days”, but you know …. I don’t want to idealize things. When he suggested that we could hang out together on a future AC tour through Europe, I showed little enthusiasm. I knew that he would be gentle and nice as he’s always been, given the opportunity to step out of this repressing role. But I also knew that in the end, there was so little we would have to talk about. It wouldn’t be possible to connect again.

Rest in peace, Seth.

29 Comments

  1. Michael

    I was hoping for some words from you! crazy to think that you guys met in Fla. in the house of MASSACRE / DEATH and then went back and formed such great bands of your own. It’s always incredible to learn these things here, how small and creative the scene was and all. I saw AC in 2000 or 2001 and Seth wore a Fear Of God shirt. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 14:53 | Permalink
  2. Johnny

    Finally worked up the nerve to speak to him at the last NOLA show. Nice guy. Too bad so many people didn’t “get it”

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 15:13 | Permalink
  3. howardx

    another good one! especially impressed by your willingness to confront (and admit publicly) your pc errors of the past.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    Oh I’m boring my friends with that since so many years now, I might as well do it here.

    [Reply]

    howardx Reply:

    kudos for the self awareness, its a rare thing to see these days.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 17:36 | Permalink
  4. DLO

    I was not a fan of his music but it is always a shame one a person checks out too soon. 43 is too young to die.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 18:41 | Permalink
  5. Rivethead

    I totally detest AC’s “humour” and I think Seth was an idiot. BUT I applaud to this post. Such a level of reflection is singular among music blogs. Hats off Erich. With or without mp3 files doesn’t really matter to me. I will always read what you post (or PRINT 😉 ).

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 19:08 | Permalink
  6. Tomasso

    Anal Cunt never meant anything to me, their music completely passed me by. Still I second DLO’s sentiment: It’s always sad to hear about someone go who had at least another have of a creative life to go.

    On a completely different note: Boy, were we full of ourselves back then. It’s a major embarassment to me to read some of the stuff I wrote back then in the early issues of Trust magazine, the humorless absoluteness of our judgments – I even prefer the adolescent idiocies and tales of drunkenness on the street of my very first fanzine back in 1983. It sounds more human, at least. At the same time, I don’t think we were wrong. We just went about it in a completely wrong way.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    Another great input, Tomasso. “At the same time, I don’t think we were wrong. We just went about it in a completely wrong way.” – I guess that’s how I see it. A lot of what we said and did back then was of course a product of the times we lived in. Things were so polarized and the underground was still, well – underground. Things had to be tried out, different roles models too etc.

    I’ve been meaning to dig out the old TRUST issues, but I just can’t force myself to go down to the basement and work a way through the chaos there. I don’t remember your columns in detail, I only remember totally hating them, haha. So good we’re buddy-ghouls today.

    [Reply]

    DLO Reply:

    Youth can be arrogant, but I still applaud the ideals.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 19:23 | Permalink
  7. Ephraim

    A retarded facist fuck died. Who cares?

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    Other retarded facist (sic) fucks do, apparantly.

    [Reply]

    Ephraim Reply:

    Thanks for indicating my misspelling, grand master. Still do not care about the symbol Putnam that passed away. May or should feel sorry for the loss of his dearest but the indvidual remains unknown to me. Still all he, or his art-personality, or his misguided mind stood for remains utterly disgusting and shameful from any humane point of view. So, I don’t care about the passing of the that public person he was. At least, to be honest, I did not whish him to die, yet his passing does not touch me in any way.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    Well, if you believe that Seth is (was) a “symbol” for fascism, you probably don’t now too much about fascism.

    [Reply]

    howardx Reply:

    some people tag everything/everyone they dont like as “fascist” these days. “they quit serving breakfast at mcdonalds! dude thats so fascist”

    [Reply]

    Ephraim Reply:

    Who said something about a symbol for fascism? None.

    Anyway, he had relations to several known rascist bands (Mudoven, Raunchous Bros., Vaginal Jesus – oh, sorry, they might be joking as well…) which is certainly not anything like twisted humour.

    And, by the way, Howard, being cool for being offensive and consequently non-PC and provoking but not accepting other’s opinions might not be fascist but still childish. Some people tag everything non-d’accord with their infantile opinion as PC just because they’re unable to think across the border or their own arrogance. Period, old fart.

    [Reply]

    howardx Reply:

    glad i could give you the opportunity to be a liberal scold! have a nice day sonny.

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 22:18 | Permalink
  8. Shane

    A hell of a great read thank you.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 13-Jun-11 at 23:15 | Permalink
  9. I had no idea who Seth was before your post. As usually, while I have no interest in “grind” or whatever of the more extreme form of music, I couldn’t stop reading. Anal Cunt was the only band in the gengre that I “liked”, except FOG(no kidding! and no ass kissing I think you had at least a sound of your own), cause of the humor.

    Oh, I just copied the above from my FB post since I know we need more comments here. Now I read Putnam was regarded as a fascist? I just took all the stuff I heard by AC as pure twisted humour. I mean did anyone take a song like Hitler was a sensisitive man as not being a joke?

    [Reply]

    J. Low Reply:

    I totally agree with you. It’s all so over the top, you can’t take it serious. I mean, the songtitles:i went back in time and voted for hitler. sorry, NOBODY can take this serious. unfortunately, there seem to be people who do, some dumb idiot rednecks (as erich wrote above) and also the oh so sensitive p.c. fraction. I mean, nobody has to like this stuff (I never really was into that band, for a short moment it was a good joke but it became boring very fast, always the same joke repeating again and again). however, rest in peace, mr. putnam.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 14-Jun-11 at 09:17 | Permalink
  10. Michael

    http://www.turnitdown.de/637.html 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on 14-Jun-11 at 15:21 | Permalink
  11. Smitty

    I saw them one time around the time of the first album and Seth had broken his foot the night before and hobbled up on stage on crutches and then proceeded to throw them at the crowd. You get what you deserve and the hardcore and “extreme metal” crowds of that era deserved the abuse. Musically, they could be hilarious or tedious and usually but you still can’t deny his, as it was really Seth’s vision and aesthetic, and their…uh…yeah, importance. R.I.P.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 14-Jun-11 at 17:24 | Permalink
  12. Brian

    Very good job on this, Erich! I saw A.C. at ABC NO RIO in New York, it was 1991 or 1992. They were great. The only played for about 10 or 15 minutes but they were totally wild. Seth seemed to be trying to hurt himself constantly. Not in a GG Allin way, but just like jumping in the air and landing on his neck. I remember thinking I was in actual danger when he started swinging the microphone over his head by the cord, really hard, with about 6 feet of slack as he was standing right in the crowd. I’m amazed no one got hit in the face. Anyway, they were really good that day, with much more frantic energy than in any of the youtube videos I’ve seen. I remember being put off by Seth when I bought a CD from him. He held it out like he was going to hand it to me, and when I went to take it he pulled it back and said “Eight dollars”. I don’t know if he thought I was going to grab it and run out the door or what. Well thats my memory. He certainly made an impression! I stopped following when the “songs” started having titles, which seemed to take away more than they added. RIP Seth!

    [Reply]

    Posted on 14-Jun-11 at 19:47 | Permalink
  13. johnny

    dude you know what the problem with your blog is? it makes it kinda hard to read other music blogs. top stories, top writing, top quality music and all from a living legend. long live fear of god!

    [Reply]

    Posted on 14-Jun-11 at 19:59 | Permalink
  14. el perro

    Got into hc/grindcore around ’91 and when I discovered AC I loved them so much that I even did my homemade AC shirt. After a few years I got tired of it but I just realized now that I have to thanx Seth for making me hate all the 90s’ PC crap that unfortunately is still around. It amaze me that people still don’t get it. RIP Seth. Now start a new project with GG and Gas Chamber!

    [Reply]

    Posted on 14-Jun-11 at 21:47 | Permalink
  15. elliott

    i liked all of seth’s many many bands because first of all you had the pure noise stuff which i just couldn’t and still can’t get enough of. also this is gonna sound childish but i’ve always just loved seeing people cringe. plus he took the piss out of everything be it pc fucks or black metal. rip seth you were an influence on my music. and yes some of his jokes were a little um much (vaginal jesus) but ya know i never got tired of it.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 15-Jun-11 at 03:27 | Permalink
  16. horsth

    when playing my hometown, he made quite an impression by asking everybody what to shout to get into fights at the local soccer game; dont know if he put that idea to work though…

    and Feedback Recycling ruled!

    [Reply]

    J Reply:

    hey man, thanks for the nice words about feedback recycling. two of us formed a joke metal band later. thanks to some twisted logic, i believe it was reasonably popular with collectors and such folks (unlike our “real” music projects). anyway, maybe you’ll like it:

    http://www.myspace.com/professorhannover

    cheers J

    [Reply]

    Posted on 15-Jun-11 at 18:11 | Permalink
  17. malfeitor

    http://www.millchurch.org/index.php?p=1_59_Seth-Putnam

    This solo work is still his best stuff.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 16-Jun-11 at 01:50 | Permalink
  18. Anal Cunt put out some great noisecore, and Mr. Putnam was an inspired and innovative vocalist of the genre. His gurgling, warbling screeches were truly innovative at the time of the release of some of their early albums. In fact his death will probably be the best publicity that noisecore will ever get, so that’s pretty great in my book. Sure, most of their stuff wasn’t very memorable, but AC has recorded some great tracks, to be sure. In fact I would say that they recorded some of the best comedic grindcore songs ever. I personally was greatly influenced by their music, and have most certainly been thoroughly entertained by them many a time. Even though I haven’t bothered to go see them play since I saw them play in Chicago around 1995, I still remember two things about the show – how beet red and strained Mr Putnam’s face looked while he was screaming, and the fact that he set a 311 t-shirt on fire and threw it into the crowd, lighting a kid’s hair on fire during the song “311 sucks”. To anyone who was seriously, deeply offended by the retarded, juvenile jokes on their albums, I can only quote the Quincy Punx: “Fuck You if You Can’t Take a Joke”.
    Anyway, thanks for the remeniscences… it’s good to hear a humanization of someone who has always seemed to me to be more of a cartoon character than a real person.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    I really liked this: “Anyway, thanks for the remeniscences… it’s good to hear a humanization of someone who has always seemed to me to be more of a cartoon character than a real person.”

    [Reply]

    Posted on 16-Jun-11 at 02:07 | Permalink
  19. J

    Hi Erich and all.

    I was a member of the band Feedback Recycling, so I spent some time with Seth as we toured with A.C. While I remember him as calm and friendly, I had trouble connecting with the guy: We were very different types of people. To put it in simple terms, he was a Sodom fan, I was a Lärm fan. I didn’t eat animals, he loved meat. He tried to get laid, I found this attitude sexist. As a band, we tried our hands on complex song structures, while A.C. seemed to have no composed songs at all.

    I wasn’t in touch with Seth after touring. However I did read somewhere that he got into doubtful political territory later. At the time, this surprised me as I thought he was totally non-political in character. Perhaps it was like Erich suggested: Provocation for provocation’s sake.

    You may think about their releases what you want, but A.C. definitely was an absolutely unique band live. Their energy was unparalleled. On stage, there was literally NO compromise. Maybe they were 100% punk. They went absolutely berserk at ALL of the shows I saw. Many of the performances lasted only a few minutes, because their equipment was broken by then (also see the post by Brian: “I remember thinking I was in actual danger”).

    A word about moralism: Bands like Fear of God and fanzines like Trust influenced me and many others greatly in our adolescent years. As a matter of fact, this post was brought to my attention by a friend who writes for Trust.

    Looking back today, the messages come across exaggerated, simple and bold, but the impetus did play a role in us becoming the people we are now. I recall Erich talking about his radical political activities when we met at that “legendary” gig in Leipzig, and I remember how it made me feel like some kind of protected middle-class kid with a halfhearted left-wing attitude. I left Leipzig telling myself I should be more active on a political level.

    A word about “No Harmonies No Sense”: The song was a perfect example for ultimate musical efficiency. It’s not only enjoyable on a humorous level, but also qualifies as actual experimental music in my eyes. It proved just how loud complete silence can be. I think we “covered” the song a couple of times at Feedback Recycling gigs.

    Greetings from Sydney,
    J

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    yo j.! will probably see hard ons in first of july in hannover, should i say greetings from ya?

    [Reply]

    J Reply:

    sure mate. say hi to the world’s hardest rocking band in 2011.

    [Reply]

    howardx Reply:

    “I remember how it made me feel like some kind of protected middle-class kid with a halfhearted left-wing attitude. I left Leipzig telling myself I should be more active on a political level.”

    heres a good argument FOR the pc stuff, good post j.

    [Reply]

    J Reply:

    agreed! some of the preaching did leave traces, some of it was merely an annoying addition to the overall noise level. i guess it depends on whether you value source. naturally, folks wouldn’t (shouldn’t?) accept words of advice from people they don’t respect.

    [Reply]

    My penis is small Reply:

    “It’s not only enjoyable on a humorous level, but also qualifies as actual experimental music in my eyes. It proved just how loud complete silence can be.” this pretty much sums up my thoughts about that song too when I heard it and watched a youtube clip Erich sent me. By the way great post J!

    [Reply]

    J Reply:

    Haha yeah for this particular piece, Fear of God served as “the grinding man’s John Cage”!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4%E2%80%B233%E2%80%B3

    [Reply]

    Thomas Reply:

    J –

    I’m not embarassed in the slightest bid about my time at Trust, and I have to say I’m quite proud of what we did and accomplished back then (and Dolf still does, of course, which doesn’t seize to amaze me). I’m also absolutely in accord what Trust did stand for and the way the magazine did it. Could it have been better? Sure. Could the writing have been better, sharper even? Absolutely (judging by Dolf’s dyslexia it still does – no offense meant). At the same time I tend to think that at my time at Trust (issue 1 till 25 or so) the magazine did become much better (as did my writing). If I say that I am embarassed by stuff in Trust, then that applies only to stuff that I did write and how I might have presented myself. Well, I guess it comes with the territory, being young, dumb and full of ideals in an environment that did not exactly have all that much room for ideals. Looking back I tend to think that a lot of stuff I rejected back then is much more of a statement of all the thing I wanted to stand for than a lot of the stuff that I thought backed up my view of the world. But if Trust actually helped to inspire others to think about how they wanted to shape their lives (in whatever direction), then it’s all for the better. I’m still embarassed at some thing I wrote, though.

    [Reply]

    J Reply:

    Hey Thomas,

    Thanks for your comment. I guess for many of us, it’s aways a bit of a challenge to look at old texts or song lyrics we’ve written. It’s probably only normal that we feel some embarrassment, but I assume that’s mainly linked to the facts that 1) the stuff was published in some form or other, and 2) we were actually honest in what we said. Maybe it helps to try and see this stuff like private diary entries.

    I guess it’s important to acknowledge that we thought, felt and communicated certain things at a certain time, and that these statements are valid only within the context of that particular time and surroundings.

    I’m leading a very different life today, but it’s safe to say I still have some little spark in me that goes back to the days when voices like Trust and Fear of God planted their seeds somewhere in my system.

    Otherwise, why would I write posts like this one, when I’ve got ten million other things to do?

    Cheers guys.
    J.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    I wanna thank J too or his great comment. What a way to enter the scene! Made me go down to the basement and look for that Feedback Recycling 7″ I knew I still had somewhere ……

    [Reply]

    J Reply:

    Hey E.
    Thanks man. Nice place you’ve got here.
    Cheers J.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 16-Jun-11 at 03:28 | Permalink
  20. Rusty James

    I saw AxCx countless times live and met Seth several times, both in Europe and in the States. He was my friend and he will be sadly missed. You never knew what to expect from an AxCx show, it could be one hour long or three minutes short, it could be funny and/or dangerous. Seth did no compromise, neither in music, nor in his own life. R.I.P.!

    [Reply]

    Posted on 16-Jun-11 at 14:17 | Permalink
  21. Wow, what a great read, kinda like a book that you don’t want to put down. Never got into AC, maybe the timing was wrong with my exposure. “You might wanna go as far as saying that he had transformed his life into art”, fits well with the Foucault quote of the moment that you’ve had up for a long time. Well my friend you have rubbed elbows with a lot of characters in your 40some years, you might say that now that we’ve rubbed elbows…your life is complete. 🙂 Thanx a ton for the stimulation and the impetus to do some reflecting of my own.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 16-Jun-11 at 16:25 | Permalink
  22. Michael

    wow! amazing how many guys just try to talk seth’s racsist ambitions down only not to submit, they’re actually liking and enjoying a racist’s work.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    Yeah, that’s quite amazing, isn’t it. Guess we all secretly belong to the KKK.

    [Reply]

    EyesTee Reply:

    Someone please ban this admin guy! He’s revealing our secrets…

    [Reply]

    howardx Reply:

    “micheal” mispells “rascist” the same way “ephraim” did.

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    You’re totally right: Guessing from the narrow IP-range, the same guy (living in the greater Frankfurt area probably) has used three different nick names here. Spineless wanker.

    [Reply]

    sean Reply:

    I personally put Seth alongside Gus Chamber…you’ll probably want me to elaborate, but behind closed doors these guys seemed highly (HIGHLY) intelligent (I can verify this personally due to a brief contact with Gus, as well as interviewing the man).

    That intelligence was certainly misapplied…but to me, the “wit” was inescapable. I “got it”…though the redneck humor could make my skin crawl.

    And speaking solely of Seth, I never met the man, never had a single interaction with him…but going by the title and cover art alone of the “Picnic Of Love” ep…again, I think I could understand “what” he may have been all about.

    “Racist/Homophobe” is so fucking knee-jerk in the 21st century…I have held court with “scene gods” in real life…they are every bit as racist, mysoginistic, and sexist as any fucking low-intelliegnce/low-man out there. They’ve said things around me that shocked me, and I’m a person who has an open mind to disgusting things and lowbrow “art” overall. No one is exempt on this planet form being judged.

    [Reply]

    J. Low Reply:

    you’re right, all secret nazis here! but who wonders, a blog where you can download the first skrewdriver lp must be full of hidden racists, sexists and homophobes, right? we’re all turning into nazis and don’t even realize. may the almighty antifa save us from evil!

    lame discussion.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 17-Jun-11 at 19:08 | Permalink
  23. Balkan Toni

    Whilst I never listened to their stuff, I know that their song titles often made me giggle. Sometimes I’d even burst into a hearty laugh. This was particularly embarassing when it happened in punky surroundings, for example while reading some fanzine’s scathing report on just how nazi-evil A.C are – during a D-punk show. The disapproving looks of my punk friends burnt like fire!

    [Reply]

    Posted on 17-Jun-11 at 23:01 | Permalink
  24. Leonid B.

    I don´t wanna talk bad about a guy that just passed away and I personally don´t know much about his actions, nor did I ever give a shit about A.C. but if their singer really held links to White Power groups, sharing the stage with the likes of No Remorse, giving interviews to White Power magazines and such, I think this behaviour is door opening to right wing extremists, no matter how the intentions were initially. That´s exactly how hardcore developed it´s own White Power section in the past decade or so. It happens because there is allways middlemen connecting the scenes, while no one else is giving a shit. Happened in the Metal scene, Goth,you name it. Dangerous, very dangerous! Again, I don´t know if these accusations are true or what, but I find it weird that no one here would respond to that stuff and everybody just keeps talking about the old times and whether A.C. ´s lyrics where funny or not. Maybe it´s because you don´t say that shit at a funeral, I don´t know…

    [Reply]

    Admin Reply:

    Yes, very, very dangerous. Thanks to Seth Putnam, fascists now believe that Hitler was a sensitive man. Door opening, man, door opening. Very, very dangerous. Now they’re in and will fuck up Hardcore. And the world. We’re all gonna die. Very, very dangerous. Can you help? Should we send them back through that door? Is the door still open? So many questions.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 18-Jun-11 at 22:58 | Permalink
  25. Leonid B.

    Again, I did not refer to the lyrics of A.C., but to accusations of beeing personally linked to “real” right wingers. By the way, I allways thought the biggest p.c. assholes turn into the most ignorant pricks once they find out no one would listen to their self rightous preaching anyways. Reading your previous comment seems to prove me right! Ughh, what a lame discussion I wish you guys would have a life, not just a past…

    [Reply]

    Posted on 19-Jun-11 at 08:55 | Permalink
  26. What kind of life do you mean? Standing by the door? Some sort of a door opener life? That would be damn great.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 19-Jun-11 at 08:59 | Permalink
  27. Leonid B.

    Well, if that the only thing that comes to your mind, you better stick to your blog debating things that happend 20, 30 years ago…

    [Reply]

    Stefan Will Reply:

    What have you anonymous selfrighteous coward ever achieved in your life? Probably n.o.t.h.i.n.g.

    [Reply]

    howardx Reply:

    everybody is pretty happy here, debating things that happened 20, 30 years ago and no one seems inclined to worry about what you think. hope your ego can take the blow…

    [Reply]

    Posted on 19-Jun-11 at 09:04 | Permalink
  28. matthew

    Oddly enough, one of the first “underground” bands I’ve gotten into was Anal Cunt, through an old ad in a fanzine. I was intrigued by the name, and winded up trying to dig up information.

    I winded up getting in contact with Charlie Infection from Ax/ction records, I was probably 13 or 14 at the time, still listening to Dead Kennedys, Black Flag, etc. I winded up getting a copy of the Anal Cunt/Psycho split and Another E.P.

    This music floored me, I couldn’t get enough. I winded up tracking down all of the early Anal Cunt material, and started corresponding with Seth. He was very cool, would send me free stuff along with the packages I bought.

    I started listening to the Earache stuff, which I found funny as a teenager. Then I started listening to some of the later stuff, which wasn’t too funny anymore. I kind of just grew out of it.

    This is a weird thing to admit to, but I got through actual hardcore/punk through Anal Cunt. I think the first thing that hit me was Spastic Rat’s “Incite to Violence” from the Ax/ction records compilation 7″. I bought it because the same label put out the Anal Cunt split.

    Years later, I’m still involved with listening to hardcore, collecting records. If it wasn’t for curiosity from such a vulgar name, I wouldn’t have even found all of the records I have now. Although I do not agree with the way Anal Cunt went, and eventually lost touch, I want to give a thank you Seth. R.I.P.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 19-Jun-11 at 17:01 | Permalink
  29. Rick

    This was a great post. I just wanted to say I’ve love reading you blog for some time now. Tons of great stuff, lots of awesome history put into words so well. I was a fan of AC’s early material. Great wall of noise with some of the harshest vocals, completely unhinged and out of control. I liked them up through Morbid Florist, which was the last AC record I owned. I still put it on from time to time just to blast that guitar sound. I know lots of people including my current roommates who are old punks HATE Seth and all of his lyrics/antics, etc. My band played with AC twice in Florida and both times I met Seth he was well mannered, quiet, and a nice guy. I even witnessed him being respectful to ethnic people of darker complexion as they bought merchandise from him (I was selling merch right next to him). I don’t know much about his personal life or his supposed links to white power groups, but I do know that the man carved out his place in grindcore/noisecore history and left a legacy behind that, regardless if you love him, hate him, or don’t care about him, will always be remembered.
    RIP Seth, and thank you Erich for the great writings.

    [Reply]

    Posted on 25-Jun-11 at 22:55 | Permalink

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